Anthony Martin

Professor of Practice

Office: 400 Dowman Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322

Phone: 404-727-6476

Fax: 404-727-4448

Email: geoam@emory.edu

Education

  • B.S., Geobiology, St. Joseph's College, Indiana
  • M.S., Geology, Miami University, Ohio
  • Ph.D., Geology, University of Georgia

Biography

Anthony (Tony) Martin was born in Terre Haute, Indiana. Following up on an early affinity to natural history, he combined interests in biology and geology to earn a B.S. degree in geobiology from St. Joseph’s College (Indiana), then an M.S. in geology from Miami University (Ohio) and Ph.D. in geology from the University of Georgia. Although trained mostly as a geologist and paleontologist, his research emphasis is in ichnology, the study of modern and fossil traces. Among Martin’s fossil discoveries or co-discoveries are: the only known burrowing dinosaur; the oldest dinosaur burrows in the geologic record; the oldest fossil crayfish in the Southern Hemisphere; the oldest bird tracks in Australia; and the best assemblage of polar dinosaur tracks in the Southern Hemisphere. He has taught a wide variety of undergraduate classes in geology and ecology at Emory University, including field courses in the southeastern and western U.S., the Bahamas, and Australia. Martin is the author of two editions of a popular college textbook, Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (Wiley-Blackwell), as well as Life Traces of the Georgia Coast (Indiana University Press) and Dinosaurs Without Bones (Pegasus Books). Martin also does much outreach on ichnology and paleontology through public speaking and his blog, Life Traces of the Georgia Coast, and is active on Twitter as @Ichnologist. In 2015, in recognition of his significant contributions to research, teaching, and public service, he was elected as a Fellow in The Explorers Club and a Fellow in the Geological Society of America.

Link to CV

Google Scholar Profile

ResearchGate Profile

Awards

Fellow, Geological Society of America (2015)

Fellow, The Explorers Club (2015)

Paleonturology International Award for Best Paper in Paleontology (2008)

Emory Center for Teaching and Curriculum Award for Excellence in Teaching (2006-2007)

Courses Taught

  • ENVS 125 – Ecology, Geology, and Nature Observation
  • ENVS ENVS 190 – Freshman Seminar: How to Interpret Behavior You Did Not See (cross-listed as NBB 190)
  • ENVS 190 – Freshman Seminar: Dinosaurs and Their Environments
  • ENVS 222 – Evolution of the Earth with Lab
  • ENVS 235 – Environmental Geology
  • ENVS 241, 242 – Modern and Ancient Tropical Environments Field Course, taught biannually at the Gerace Research Center, San Salvador, Bahamas
  • BIO 341 - Evolutionary Biology and BIO/ENVS 349 - Ecology of Invasions, both taught in Australia Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Program (Queensland, Australia)
  • ENVS 342 – Barrier Islands
  • ENVS 361 – Ecosystems through Time
  • ENVS 385 - Special Topics: Ecological History of Australia and New Zealand
  • ENVS 410 – Extinctions
  • ENVS 444 - Ecosystems of the Southeastern U.S. Field Course
  • ENVS 495 - Honors Research
  • ENVS 498, 499 - Individual Directed Reading, Individual Research

Research Affiliations

Honorary Research Associate, School of Geosciences, Monash University
Research Associate in Paleontology, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

Research Interests

My main research interest is ichnology, the study of plant and animal traces, such as tracks, trails, burrows, nests, and feces. I generate research questions such as: How does an organism’s body reflect its potential behavior, versus behaviors implied by its traces? Or, how do traces show behaviors similar to or differing from the few times we might directly observe an organism’s behavior?

Although I am mostly a paleontologist and geologist by training, I also study modern traces. This means using a comparative approach that looks at how traces are made and how they get preserved in the fossil record, and then developing hypotheses about how ancient organisms behaved in their environments. Because of my eclectic approach, I normally do a wide variety of geological and ecological field work, but I also enjoy studying museum specimens of trace fossils.

Potential Student Research Projects

  • Tracking and documenting traces of local mammals (beavers, foxes, river otters, mink, raccoons) or birds (great blue herons, woodpeckers, Canada geese) in the Atlanta area.
  • Tracking and documenting traces of invasive mammals (e.g., feral cats, cattle, hogs, horses) on the Georgia barrier islands.
  • Describing and interpreting Paleozoic invertebrate and vertebrate trace fossils from the southeastern U.S.
  • Describing and interpreting Holocene and Pleistocene trace fossils on San Salvador Island, Bahamas (ENVS 241-242 are prerequisites to this).

Books Published

Martin, A.J., 2014, Dinosaurs Without Bones: Revealing Dinosaurs Lives Through Their Trace Fossils. Pegasus Press, New York: 460 p.

Martin, A.J. 2013. Life Traces of the Georgia Coast. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana: 692 p.

Varricchio, D.J., Martin, A.J., and Katsura, Y. 2009. El Dinosaurio Que Excavó Su Madriguera [The Dinosaur That Dug Its Burrow]. ¡Fundamental! 15, Fundación Conjunto Paleontológico de Teruel-Dinópolis, Teruel, Spain, 72 p. (Translated into English and Spanish.)

Martin, A. J. 2006. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs (2nd Edition). Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford, UK: 560 p.

Martin, A.J. 2006. Trace Fossils of San Salvador. Gerace Research Center, San Salvador, Bahamas: 80 p.

Martin, A.J. 2001. Introduction to the Study of Dinosaurs. (1st Edition). Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, U.K.: 426 p.

Public-Outreach Courses (DVD)

Martin, A.J., and Hawks, J. 2010. Major Transitions in Evolution. The Teaching Company, Chantilly, Virginia: 24 lectures on DVD and course guidebook, 116 p. Co-taught with paleoanthropologist John Hawks (University of Wisconsin).

Published Research Articles and Abstracts (since 2010)

2015

Bransford, S., Martin, A.J., and Page, M. 2015. St. Catherines Island Flyover (edited video and article). Southern Spaces: An Interdisciplinary Journal about Regions, Places, and Cultures of the US South and their Global Connections [online only].

Broecker, C., Martin, A.J., and Rindsberg, A.K. 2015. Ichnodiversity vs. species diversity: variability in trace fossils of the Pennington Formation (Lower Carboniferous), northwest Georgia. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 47(2): 20.

Martin, A.J., Blair, M., Dattilo, B., Howald, S., and Farlow, J.O. The ups and downs of Diplocraterion in the Glen Rose Formation (Albian), Texas (USA). Geodinamica Acta, 27, DOI: 10.1080/09853111.2015.1037151.

Martin, A.J., and Whitten, M.J. 2015. First known fossil bird tracks (Pleistocene) on San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Geologica Acta, 12(1): 63-68.

Martin, A.J., Page, M., Vance, R.K., and Skaggs, S. 2015. Big burrows of alligators change ecosystems, help alligators survive cold winters, droughts, and fires, and allow them to be terrestrial predators. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 47(2): 21.

Rindsberg, A.K., and Martin, A.J. Caster’s plasters: Neoichnological experiments by Kenneth Caster on limulids in 1937. Geological Association of Canada Special Volume 9, papers from Ichnia, International Ichnological Congress Meeting, St. Johns, Newfoundland (Canada): 197-210.

2014

Martin, A.J. 2014. Trace fossil of a walking fish from the Pottsville Formation (Late Carboniferous) of Alabama. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 46(3): 86.

Martin, A.J., and Whitten, M.J. 2014. GIS mapping of raccoon (Procyon lotor) trails and associated invertebrate and vertebrate traces in storm-washover fans, St. Catherines Island, Georgia. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 46(3): 87.

Martin, A.J., Vickers-Rich, P., and Rich, T.H. 2013. Oldest known avian footprints from Australia: Eumeralla Formation (Albian), Dinosaur Cove, Victoria. Palaeontology, 57: 7-19.

Martin, A.J., Rich, T.H., Vickers-Rich, P., Hall, M., Kool, L., and Trusler, P. 2014. The Great Cretaceous Walk: an ichnological survey of Lower Cretaceous strata in Victoria, Australia and implications for Gondwanan paleontology. North American Paleontological Convention Abstract Book, Paleontological Society Special Publications, 13: 63.

Weaver, P.G., Martin, A.J., and Tacker, R.C. 2014. Early bulldozers and imposters: a re-examination of trace fossils from the Albemarle Group, Carolina Terrane of North Carolina. 10th North American Paleontological Convention Abstract Book, The Paleontological Society Special Publications, 13: 147.

2013

Martin, A.J. 2013. Book review: Roadside Geology of Georgia. Southeastern Geology, 50: 55-57.

Martin, A.J., and Weaver, Patricia W. 2013. Ediacaran trace fossils from the Albemarle Group of the Carolina Terrane, North Carolina (USA): marks of a mobile lifestyle on a Precambrian sea bottom. In Hibbard, J., and (editors), One Arc, Two Arcs, Old Arc, New Arc: A 21st Century Perspective on the Geology of the Carolina Terrane in Central North Carolina: Carolina Geological Society, Field Trip Guidebook: 185-192.

Martin, A.J., Datillo, Blair, M., Howald, S., and Farlow, J.O. 2013. Invertebrate Burrows and Dinosaur Tracks, Destroying One Another (Or Not): Composite Ichnofabrics in the Glen Rose Formation (Albian), Texas, USA. In Demircan, H. (editor), XII International Ichnofabric Workshop Abstracts, Çannakale, Turkey: 56-57.

2012

Martin, A.J., Rich, T.H., Hall, M., Vickers-Rich, P., and Vasquez-Prokopec, G. 2012. A polar dinosaur-track assemblage from the Eumeralla Formation (Albian), Victoria, Australia. Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology, 36: 171-188.

Datillo, B., Howald, S.C., Farlow, J.O., and Martin, A.J. 2012. How many track horizons are exposed at Dinosaur Valley State Park?: stratigraphy of the Cretaceous Glen Rose Formation track sites of the Paluxy River, Glen Rose, Texas. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 45.

Blair, M., Datillo, B., Martin, A.J., and Farlow, J.O. 2012. Microstratigraphic analysis of burrow-reworked dinosaur track bed at Joanna’s track site, Cretaceous Glen Rose Formation, Glen Rose, Texas. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 45(7): 399.

Martin, A.J., Page, M., Vance, R.K., and Skaggs, S. 2012. Dens of the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) as traces and their predictive value for finding large archosaur burrows in the geologic record. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, 32 [Suppl. to No. 3]: 136.

Martin, A.J. 2012. Toward one neoichnology: the Georgia barrier islands as exemplars for integrated study of modern continental and marine traces and ichnoassemblages. The 3rd International Congress on Ichnology, Abstract Book. Memorial University, St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada: 61.

Rindsberg, A.K., and Martin, A.J. 2012. Caster’s plasters: Kenneth Caster’s neoichnologic experiments on limulids in the 1930s. Ichnia 2012, The 3rd International Congress on Ichnology, Abstract Book. Memorial University, St. Johns, Newfoundland, Canada: 78.

Martin, A.J. 2012. Intersections between ichnology and invasion ecology on the Georgia barrier islands, with applications to conservation biology. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 44(4): 76. 

2011

Martin, A.J., and Rindsberg, A.K. 2011. Ichnological diagnosis of ancient storm-washover fans, Yellow Banks Bluff, St. Catherines Island. In Bishop, G.A, Rollin, H.B., and Thomas, D.H. (editors), Geoarchaeology of St. Catherines Island, Georgia. Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History, No. 94: 114-127. PDF

Martin, A.J. 2011. Ichnology in a time of global climate change: predicted effects of rising sea level and temperatures on organismal traces of the Georgia coast. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, (43)2: 86.

Martin, A.J., and Varricchio, D.J. 2011. Paleoecological utility of insect trace fossils in dinosaur nesting sites of the Two Medicine Formation (Campanian), Choteau, Montana. Historical Biology, 23: 15-25. doi: 10.1080/08912963.2010.505285

Rindsberg, A.K., and Martin, A.J. 2011. Ringgold Gap, Georgia: a classic locality for Ordovician and Silurian trace fossils. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 43(2): 13.

Shope J.B., and Martin, A.J. 2011. Lithology, physical sedimentary structures, and trace fossils of the Pinelog Formation, and their applications to mapping in the Blue Ridge Province of Georgia. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 43(2): 68.

2010

Martin, A.J., Vazquez-Prokopec, G.M., and Page, M. First known feeding trace of the Eocene bottom-dwelling fish Notogoneus osculus and its paleontological significance. PLoS One, 5: http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0010420

Tacker, R.C., Martin, A.J., Weaver, P.G., and Lawver, D.R. 2010. Trace fossils versus body fossils: Oldhamia recta revisited. Precambrian Research, 178: 43-50.
PDF

Pienkowski, G., Martin, A.J., and Meyer, C.A. (editors). 2010. Preface. Special Issue, Second International Congress on Ichnology (Ichnia 2008). Geological Quarterly, 53: 369-371. PDF

Martin, A.J., and Rindsberg, A.K. 2010. Neoichnology of storm washover fans on the Georgia coast and its uses in paleoecology. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 42(1): 104.

Rindsberg, A.K., and Martin, A.J. 2010. The bioprint of burrowing Paleozoic arthropods. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 42(1): 105.

Goldstein, D., McKinney, M., and Martin, A.J. 2010. Mobile predators and mobile prey: compound traces indicate active hunting behavior. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, 42(1): 104.